The Pulse

The Pulse

Type:VideoLanguage:EnglishCategories:NewsCurrent AffairsStatus:On going Description: RTHK's English-language current affairs programme that takes "The Pulse" of Hong Kong ... and the world around it.

"The Pulse" is presented by locally and internationally known journalist and writer Steve Vines.

Its focus? The latest events and trends that affect Hong Kong - from the corridors of power and business boardrooms, to the streets and dai pai dongs.

"The Pulse" is politics. What's happening in the Legislative Council and on the streets right now.

"The Pulse" is the media, informing us how well or badly our press and broadcast organisations diagnose and reflect the society around us.

"The Pulse" is insightful, in-depth reports and interviews on current issues - examining those issues in depth, looking behind and beyond the news.

Its focus is on the timely. The Now.

Keep your eye ... and your finger ... on "The Pulse".

If you want to discuss anything you've seen in "The Pulse", or anything in the public eye right now, or just to talk about the show, why not join in the debate on our Facebook page, RTHK's The Pulse. 

The programme is aired every Saturday on RTHK 31 & 31A at 18:00, and a repeat on Sundays at 06:30.

Archive available later after broadcast. ** Please note that the programme air-time on TV is different with webcast time.



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Occupy Central Narrows the Field; District Councils "Promote" Constitutional Reform 00:21:53 2014-05-09
On Tuesday, Occupy Central with Love and Peace (OCLP) held its third “Constitutional Reform Deliberation Day”. Around 2,500 participants voted for their preferred Chief Executive electoral proposal at polling booths in five different districts of Hong Kong. There were 15 proposals, all satisfying international standards on universal and equal suffrage, from which they could choose. Hong Kong permanent residents will be able to vote for the three shortlisted proposals on the “Civil Referendum Day” on 22 June. The selected proposal will be submitted to the Hong Kong government. But there have been criticism sthat the process has pre-empted that vote, with the more moderate proposals being voted out at the expense of more extreme ones.

Well with us in the studio are Benny Tai of Occupy Central, and Michael Davis, who submitted one of those perhaps more moderate proposals.

In societies that get to fully elect their government there’s always a bit of a conundrum when the government spends public money to convince the public of a viewpoint it might not share. It gets even more confusing when this activity occurs in the process of a consultation supposedly to assess public views. Hong Kong's government allocated a total of HKS4.5 million in public money to district councils to promote the idea that proposals for electoral reform should follow the Basic Law, but do the public’s representatives have a right to help determine how that money was spent?