The Pulse

The Pulse

Type:VideoLanguage:EnglishCategories:NewsCurrent AffairsStatus:On going Description: RTHK's English-language current affairs programme that takes "The Pulse" of Hong Kong ... and the world around it.

"The Pulse" is presented by locally and internationally known journalist and writer Steve Vines.

Its focus? The latest events and trends that affect Hong Kong - from the corridors of power and business boardrooms, to the streets and dai pai dongs.

"The Pulse" is politics. What's happening in the Legislative Council and on the streets right now.

"The Pulse" is the media, informing us how well or badly our press and broadcast organisations diagnose and reflect the society around us.

"The Pulse" is insightful, in-depth reports and interviews on current issues - examining those issues in depth, looking behind and beyond the news.

Its focus is on the timely. The Now.

Keep your eye ... and your finger ... on "The Pulse".

If you want to discuss anything you've seen in "The Pulse", or anything in the public eye right now, or just to talk about the show, why not join in the debate on our Facebook page, RTHK's The Pulse. 

The programme is aired every Saturday on RTHK 31 & 31A at 18:00, and a repeat on Sundays at 06:30.

Archive available later after broadcast. ** Please note that the programme air-time on TV is different with webcast time.



Find us on Facebook: RTHK's The Pulse

Free Subscribe

Subscribe to this podcast and automatically receive the latest episodes. iTunes Google Reader RSS Feed
Loading ...
Brexit discussion: Martin Chung, HKBU & John Bruce, Scottish Business Group of Britcham & African Sw 00:21:37 2019-01-19
On Tuesday, British Prime Minister Teresa May faced an unprecedentedly crushing defeat in the House of Commons. Her Brexit deal which sets out the terms under which Britain might leave the European Union was rejected by 230 votes. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn tried to capitalise on this with a motion of no confidence in the government. However this manoeuvre was defeated with the help of Mrs May’s Northern Ireland allies, the DUP who dislike Mr Corbyn even more than the government – so she survived but only with a margin of 19 votes. Parliament however has forced her to come back with another exit plan by the 21st. So what does all this mean for Britain? With us to talk about that are Martin Chung, Assistant Professor of the Dept. of Govt. & International Studies at the Baptist University and John Bruce, Chairman of the Scottish Business Group of the British Chamber of Commerce Hong Kong.

According to a report from the European Commission released last year, an average Hong Kong person consumes almost 103 kg of pork, beef, poultry and other meat every year. It’s one of the highest per capita intakes in the world, higher than Europe and the United States. And it’s fed by a sizeable daily movement of live pigs across the border that’s now threatened by an outbreak of African swine fever across the mainland. Worried for the health of their own livestock, Hong Kong’s 43 pig farmers have urged the government to stop the highly contagious virus coming here.